The Official Houston SPCA Humane Education Blog

Teaching us about our animal friends


Scout Programs are in full swing at the Houston SPCA

Scout Program Graphic

The Houston SPCA’s Scout Program offers scouts of all ages in the Houston area the opportunity to learn about animals and commit to helping animals at the Houston SPCA.

Looking for a tour?

We offer guided shelter tours to scout troops for free! Your troop can go on a tour of our shelter any day of the week – just schedule it with our Community Education department at least two weeks before you arrive. Booking for tours this fall has already started and weekends fill up fast. Please email or call the Community Education department (713-869-7722 ext. 143) to schedule your troop’s shelter tour today.

Calling all Cub and Boy Scouts!

Looking to earn that next belt-loop, pin or merit badge? If your answer is yes, the Houston SPCA can help you out!  For Boy Scouts who want to earn the Dog Care merit badge, the Houston SPCA is the perfect place to start. Book a tour for your troop and learn about responsible pet care, how the Houston SPCA helps animals in our community, and what types of careers the Houston SPCA offers in animal welfare. Cub scouts can fulfill many of the requirements for the Pet Care belt-loop and pin at the Houston SPCA including taking a tour of our animal shelter, scheduling a meet and greet with a veterinarian, and learning about how animals communicate with each other and humans.

Is your Girl Scout troop looking for their next fun patch? 

If you are a Girl Scout who loves animals and wants an exclusive patch for your sash or vest, this program is for you!

The Houston SPCA Paw Pals Patch Program focuses on teaching safety around stray animals with lessons adjusted to each troop’s age level. All Girl Scouts participating will receive a unique Houston SPCA Patch and a colorful Paw Print Patch for $3 per scout. Troop leaders can purchase patch sets for their scouts during the on-site portion of this program.

To receive the Houston SPCA Paw Pals Patch set, each scout must complete the activities in the appropriate troop leader’s guide (see below). As part of the Paw Pals Patch Program, each troop is required to visit to the Houston SPCA for a tour of our shelter.

Download your Leader’s Guide:  Daisy Level Requirements

Download your Leader’s Guide:  Brownie Level Requirements

Download your Leader’s Guide:  Junior Level Requirements

Download your Leader’s Guide:  Cadette-Senior Level Requirements

Is your troop ready to commit to the Houston SPCA? 

Looking for a service project to help you or your troop achieve your bronze award, silver award, gold award or Eagle Scout rank?  Click here to check out a list of pre-approved projects for the shelter and click here to fill out an application to get started! Would your troop like to hold a donation drive for the Houston SPCA? Be sure to see our wish list for the items we need most at our shelter.

To learn more about the Houston SPCA, check out our website – www.HoustonSPCA.org  today!


The Houston SPCA is heading back to school!

The heat of summer may be sticking around but all of the kids in Houston are headed back to school – and so is the Houston SPCA!

School webpage graphic

The Houston SPCA’s Community Education School Program focuses on teaching children the importance of empathy, kindness, compassion and caring for others while integrating necessary grade level state standards into each lesson plan created for the classroom. We also provide a broader scope of careers for students by relating many animal welfare working opportunities to them through our community education presentations. We frequently participate in school-wide events such as career days, health and safety fairs, environmental fairs and other community-related programs.

Storybook Reading Sessions:

For pre-K – 1st graders, we offer storybook reading sessions. Teachers can pick from our list of children’s books which includes stories about animals being rescued, how to interact with animals you just met and why animal shelters are important. Storybook reading sessions are between 20-30 minutes and can fit into any part of a teacher’s schedule.

Our current storybook collection for the classroom includes:

“Max Talks to Me” – Claire Buchwald.

Alex and his dog, Max, are true friends – the kind that share each other’s excitement, comfort each other when they are sad, wait together when parents are away, and have fun wherever they are. Alex is learning that every good relationship is a mutual one.

“Kamie Cat’s Terrible Night” – Sheila Hamanaka.

Oh no! Someone forgets to put the screen back and Kamie jumps out the window. During her misadventure, Kamie gets a glimpse of how other cats live and comes to appreciate life with kind Mr. Wong.

“Call the Horse Lucky” – Juanita Havill.

While visiting her grandmother in the country, Mel discovers a neglected horse. Moved by the sight of the rib-thin pinto, Mel starts a rescue process that results in the pinto’s being moved to a horse rescue ranch.

“May I Pet Your Dog?” – Stephanie Calmenson.

What’s the best way to meet a dog and make friends? In this book, a dachshund named Harry shows you. Harry’s advice begins with one simple rule: Always ask the owner, “May I pet your dog?”

“Buddy Unchained” – Daisy Bix.

Buddy, a lovable mixed-breed dog, is happy in a new home; he tells the story of his former life and how he was rescued and came to live with a caring family.

“KokoCat, Inside and Out” – Lynda Graham-Barber.

KokoCat, a well-loved house cat, has seen the world only from the safety of her window perch. One day, she takes advantage of an open door and runs away to explore. Once outside, she finds that life is more complicated and less enjoyable than she bargained for.

School Wide Assembly Presentations:

School-wide assemblies are best for multiple age groups and range in length from 45 minutes to 1 hour. Each presentation gives an inside look into the services the Houston SPCA offers the community.

Topics include:

“Career Day: Working with Animals” 

This program focuses on introducing students to the world of animal care and welfare. Students will learn about numerous animal-related careers, how those careers benefit animals, and what qualifications are needed for those positions.

“Animals Get Bullied, Too: There’s No Excuse for Abuse” 

This program introduces the concept of animal cruelty to students and how it relates to bullying between peers. Focusing on empathy and compassion, students will learn what animal cruelty is, what to do if they see an animal being mistreated, and how to spread the word about proper treatment of animals.

“What Are Animals Trying to Tell Us? A Look at Animal Behavior” 

This program describes what animal behavior is, how animals can communicate with each other and humans, and what to do in a variety of scenarios with animals you have just met. Students will learn the differences between animals that are safe to interact with and those that should be left alone.

“Houston SPCA at a Glance: How the Houston SPCA Helps Animals”

This program gives an overview of the Houston SPCA’s mission and services it provides to the Houston community. Students will learn how and why animals are brought to the Houston SPCA, why adopting an animal from a shelter is so important, as well as how they can help our animals from home!

In-Classroom Presentations:

In-classroom presentations are between 45 minutes to 1 hour and include full lesson plans for the teacher to use with their students. We have a variety of lessons available for 2nd – 12th grade that are either single-session lessons or project-based learning lessons.

Project-based learning is a teaching method in which students gain knowledge and skills by working for an extended period of time to investigate and respond to a complex question, problem, or challenge. Students are given the opportunity to solve a real-world problem through extended research and solution-creating projects. Allowing students to learn through action increases the retention rate of taught information. Each PBL style program provided by the Houston SPCA has lesson plans for multiple sessions and a student project with grading rubrics available.

For the Houston SPCA’s full school program curriculum, please click here.

To book your presentation, please e-mail or call our Community Education department (713-869-7722 ext. 143) today.

To support the Houston SPCA’s mission of promoting commitment to and respect for all animals, please click here.

 


9 Ways to Protect Your Pets from House Fires

Dalmation in fire truckA house fire can be devastating to both humans and animals who live under the same roof. Unfortunately, in an emergency, while adults and children may already know what to do, cats and dogs can be left behind in the rush to survive. In fact, each year, an estimated 500,000 pets are affected by house fires, according to the American Kennel Club.

In observation of National Pet Fire Safety Day, here are 9 tips you can use to prevent fires and protect your animals in the event of an actual fire emergency.

How to Prevent a Fire for Pet Owners

  1. Do Not Leave Flames Unattended. Pets, who are naturally curious, could be attracted to cooking appliances, open candles or even the fire inside your fireplace. Ensure your pet cannot reach these instruments, and make sure to extinguish any open flame before leaving your residence.
  2. Consider Flameless Alternative. LED candles and other devices using light bulbs rather than open flames can be a safer alternative for residences with animals.
  3. Conceal Your Loose Wiring. From your computers to other electronics, charging cables and cords can spark a fire if chewed by an animal. Always seek to conceal or cover wires so they are out of reach from your cat or dog.
  4. Purchase Pet Rescue Stickers for Your Windows. These stickers, available free or at a nominal cost online and in stores, alert firefighters to the presence of animals in the home that may need to be rescued in the event of a fire.
  5. Know Your Pet’s Hiding Places. If a fire breaks out, your pet may become frightened and will seek out a safe hideaway. Knowing where these hiding spots are may make it easier to locate the animal during an evacuation or a fire rescue.
  6. Prepare a Pet Emergency Kit. If your cat or dog requires any medications, you may want to stow away a supply in an emergency kit you can grab and evacuate with in the event of a fire. You may also want to include veterinary paperwork, photos/descriptions of your pet in the event she runs away during the evacuation, pet food and clean, bottled water.

In The Event of a Fire…

  1. Alert Firefighters to Rescue Your Pets. If you are unable to find your pets, evacuate your home and tell fire and rescue workers about the presence of any animals and their locations, if known.
  2. Evacuate Animals with Leash or Carrier. The scene of a fire can be a traumatic experience for humans and pets alike. If you are able to reach your cat or dog, evacuate the area and either place them on a leash or carrier to prevent them from running away.
  3. Leave an Outside Door Open. As you evacuate the residence, leave a door open to the outside and call your pet’s name. Your cat or dog may hear your voice and be able to escape the fire.

Sources:


Houston Dog Park Directory

blog pic

A healthy and active lifestyle promotes not only our own quality of life, but that of our animal companions. With National Parks & Recreation Month underway in July, there is no time like the present to grab your dog and head out to your neighborhood parks.

Many parks in the Houston area offer separate or adjacent parks designed just for dogs, where they can run, jump, play and exercise. Check out these great options in your community, and make sure to observe safe practices to avoid heat stroke and other heat-related illnesses (link) while out this summer. And don’t forget, each dog park has their own rules for people and the animals they bring. For more information on dog park etiquette, check out our post on dog park manners: https://houstonspca.wordpress.com/2015/02/19/houston-spcas-dog-park-manners/

Houston

Alexander Deussen Dog Park

Harris County Precinct 1 opened the 5.25-acre Alexander Deussen Dog Park, 12303 Sonnier St., in Houston in July 2010 with separate areas for small and large dogs, plenty of shade, benches and drinking fountains for the entire family to enjoy. The park is fenced for your safety and security.

Congressman Bill Archer Bark Park

This summer, the dogs can have a blast while taking a splash at Congressman Bill Archer Bark Park, 3201 Hwy. 6, across from Bear Creek Park in West Houston. The Harris County Precinct 3 park boasts doggie swimming ponds, water fountains and plenty of shade to keep your animals cool. Open daily from dawn until dusk.

Danny Jackson Bark Park

Another Harris County Precinct 3 property, Danny Jackson Bark Park, 4700 Westpark, offers fun for you and man’s best friend inside the loop, and features separate areas for large and small dogs, each with their own pond, shade trees and a walking path.

Discovery Green Dog Runs

Two dog parks await you at the City of Houston’s lush green space downtown known as Discovery Green, 1500 McKinney. The Kinder Large Dog Run and Harriet and Joe Foster Small Dog Run offer your pets their own space for off-leash adventures in the middle of the city’s abundant people park. Crushed gravel ground cover, shade, fountains and seating areas help make an exciting experience for all members of the family.

Ervan Chew Dog Park

Ervan Chew Dog Park, 4502 Dunlavy, was the City of Houston’s first neighborhood park to allow dogs to legally run off leash and provides a fenced-in space of approximately 9,000 square feet from which dogs can exercise without restriction. The park features a small neighborhood park adjacent to the space for the kids, plus a water fountain, large shade trees and benches for the family.

Gene Green Dog Park

Gene Green Dog Park, 6500 E. Sam Houston Parkway, is one of the area’s larger dog parks, and features a pond and plenty of greenery to enjoy with the entire member of your family. A neighboring skate and splash park will have the kids enjoying some outdoor time too at this park operated by Harris County Precinct 2.

Johnny Steele Dog Park

Johnny Steele Dog Park, 2929 Allen Pkwy., sits adjacent to Buffalo Bayou on two beautiful acres near Allen Parkway and Montrose Blvd. The park features large and small dog ponds, large shade structures, water play features, a dog wash station, and drinking fountains for people and dogs. There is limited parking available alongside the Allen Parkway frontage road. The park is open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Levy Park

Looking for a small dog park inside the loop? Leave it to Levy Park’s dog park, 3801 Eastside, in Houston, which offers a little shade, ample parking, and a dog water fountain. The park is operated by the City of Houston.

Maxey Bark and Run Park

The approximately 13-acre Maxey Bark and Run Park, 601 Maxey Rd., features separate areas for small and large dogs, a dog shower area, waste disposal stations, and plenty of shade trees to enjoy with your favorite animals.

Millie Bush Bark Park

The 13-acre Harris County Precinct 3 park, 16756 Westheimer Parkway, named after the beloved pet English Springer Spaniel of President George H.W. and Barbara Bush features a double-gated and fenced area for small and large dogs, several swimming ponds, water fountains for people and dogs, and an abundance of shade trees.

Tanglewood Bark Park

Nestled at the corner of Bering and Woodway in Houston lies Tanglewood Bark Park, 5801 Woodway Dr., a small neighborhood park offering off-leash access for you and your dogs. Operated by the City of Houston.

TC Jester Bark Park

This City of Houston park in the city’s northwest side, 4201 TC Jester Blvd., offers separate small and large dog areas, double-gated entrances, a variety of drinking fountains for man and dog, and ample shade trees and benches to rest. Located behind the baseball fields at TC Jester swimming pool.

Tom Bass Regional Dog Park

Operated by Harris County Precinct 1, the Tom Bass Regional Dog Park is located at 3452 Fellows Rd.

West Webster Bark Park

Montrose’s pocket park, West Webster, 1501 W. Webster St., boasts a 5,000 square-foot dog park within that includes a drinking fountain and a dog wash area. Operated by the City of Houston.

Baytown

A Bounty of Fun Awaits at Baytown Bark Park

Large dogs can find a variety of agility equipment only steps from the neighboring skate park at Baytown Bark Park, 4334 Crosby Cedar Bayou, in Baytown. This 5-acre park features tree-lined walking paths, areas for large and small breeds, covered awning and benches, and wooded trails that connect the parks together in the vicinity.

Conroe

Canine Fun in Conroe

When the Wiggins Village Park (565 Bryant Rd., Conroe, TX 77303) opened in 1998, it boasted three baseball practice fields that eventually gave way a decade later to one of the area’s largest dog parks after two of those fields were repurposed for you and man’s best friend. Conroe residents can also enjoy access to off-leash playtime at Kasmiersky Park, 889 Old Magnolia Rd.

Deer Park

Enjoy Man’s Best Friend at Ela and Friends

The City of Deer Park features a two-acre dog park next to the Jimmy Burke Activity Center, 500 W. 13th St., constructed by Deer Park Rotary Club and the city.

Katy

Plan on a Trip to Mary Jo Peckham Park

The City of Katy offers a 14-acre park near Mary Jo Peckham Park, 5414 Franz Rd., created for both people and dog use, and includes access to lots of shade and trees, a paved walking trail and two water fountains. Dogs will find use of the park’s attractive agility equipment, and you’ll like the abundance of benches and washing areas available.

Kingwood

Aaby Dog Park

A joint initiative between Kingwood Kennels and the Aaby Foundation, the Kingwood Aaby Dog Park, 619 Lakeville Dr., offers residents the opportunity to enjoy off-leash exercise and socialization in a safe and fun environment. Residents must complete a registration form and show proof of updated vaccinations to receive access to the park, good for one year. Open daily from dusk until dawn.

Pasadena

Take in the Shade at Bay Area Bark Park

Pasadena’s five-acre Bay Area Bark Park, 7500 Bay Area Blvd.,  has an abundance of shade with a variety of trees and covered awnings, and features benches, picnic tables, a walking path, dog and people water fountains, a waste bag station, dog showers and separate areas for large and small dogs.

Pearland

Stroll on Down to Southdown

The City of Pearland offers dogs and their owners a place made just for them, with shade, benches and a variety of brightly-colored agility equipment to enjoy. Southdown Dog Park is located at 2150 County Rd. 94 (Smith Ranch Road).

Sugarland

Pack Your Bags for Pawn Springs

The City of Sugarland operates an exquisite, tropical retreat at Pawn Springs Bark Park, 15300 University Blvd., where dogs and their owners can enjoy a resort-style pond, a beach area, a misting palm tree feature and tropical plants and trees.

The Woodlands

Wet and Wild Fun at Bear Beach Dog Park

Residents and visitors of The Woodlands will enjoy a splash of fun with their dogs at Bear Branch Dog Park, 5200 Research Forest Dr., where visitors will find more than two acres of bark-covered play areas for dogs big and small. A “water play station” provides ample relief from these hot summer months, and amenities including dog waste bag stations and plenty of shade. Please note, children 9 and under are not permitted in the dog park.

Catch Sun and Fun at the Cattail Dog Park

Across from the Palmer Gold Club house in Cattail Park, 9323 Cochrans Crossing Dr., lies a quaint dog park where visitors can enjoy a space to play with their dogs. The park features a double gated and fenced area with doggie bags, a water fountain and cool-off station, and bulletin board for community events.

Small Dogs Rule at Terramont Dog Park

Neighboring the Village of Sterling Ridge, the Terramont Dog Park offers a small park for dogs of 25 lbs. or less.  The park is located at 8500 Terramont Ln.

Tomball

Burroughs Park Brings Man and Dog Together

The 320-acre Burroughs Park, 9738 Hufsmith Rd., in Tomball lines a beautiful expanse of land, a seven-acre fishing lake and even boasts a dog park to enjoy with your pets. The park, operated by Harris County Precinct 4, includes plenty of shade and eight miles of nature trails.

For more information about the Houston SPCA or to support our life-saving efforts, visit www.HoustonSPCA.org.


Preparing Your Pets for Fourth of July Fireworks

Fourth of July weekend is here! Are you prepared to have a fun, safe holiday weekend with your pets? Here are five ways to keep your pets happy on this Independence Day weekend:

1. Keep your pet inside.

The easiest way to prevent your pets from getting lost this Independence Day is to keep them inside. If you are having a big party or just a small get-together with friends, make sure someone is always aware of where your pets are. If you know that your cat or dog likes to run out the door the first chance it gets, consider putting them into their kennel for the duration of the party or get-together.

2. Check your pet’s collar for accurate identification information.

Did you know that more pets get lost on the July 4th holiday than any other day of the year? Now is a great time to update your pet’s ID tags with accurate information. Include your name, your pet’s name and a current phone number on your pet’s ID tag. Even better, have your pet micro-chipped, which increases your chances of finding your pet if they become lost.

heat-safety-week3. Keep all alcoholic beverages away from your pets.

Independence day celebrations usually include the three B’s: BBQs, beach and booze. Keep alcoholic drinks out of reach from your pet at all times. Even a small amount of alcohol can do damage. If you suspect that your pet has ingested alcohol, call your vet immediately.

4. Keep all flammable objects away from your pets.

Charcoal from the BBQ pit. Sparklers for the kids. A fire to roast marshmallows. Keep your pets away from all types of open flames or heat sources, including BBQ pits, fire pits and even sparklers. Encourage your guests to play with your pets away from any flames.

5. Keep your pets distracted during the fireworks.

While fireworks can be fun to humans, these spectacles are just loud and sometimes scary noises to your pets. The best way to help your pets get through a night of fireworks is to distract them. Turn your television on low to help drown out any firework noise, and offer treats to help keep them busy, such as a squirrel dude stuffed with frozen pet-safe peanut butter. Give your cats a new toy to play with, or a new post to scratch.

From all of us at the Houston SPCA, we hope you have a fantastic Fourth of July weekend!

The information contained in this article is not intended to treat, diagnose or cure any ailment or disease, and is provided for reference. Please consult with your veterinarian with questions or concerns related to heat safety.

Houston SPCA Summer Heat Safety Week

Founded in 1924, the Houston SPCA provides the most comprehensive array of animal adoption, shelter, rescue, rehabilitation and other programs and services in the Gulf Coast area. Check out all of our adoptable animals and consider the adoption option this summer.

Thank You for Supporting the Houston SPCA’s Mission – Make a Donation!


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Driving Home Animal Safety: Never Leave Pets in a Hot Car

Dog left in hot car

Never leave your cats, dogs and other pets in a hot car.

With the summer sun set high in the sky comes the threat of people and animals trapped in a hot car. Yet, unlike us, animals have no means of escaping the life or death situations that can occur if left inside a car during the summer.

You should never risk leaving an animal alone in the car, even if you only plan to be away for a few minutes.

heat-safety-weekEven if you park in a shaded area or crack the window, temperatures can climb to more than 120 degrees within just a few minutes. All the while, the body temperature of your pet will continue to rise. If their temperature rises above 106 degrees, your pets can suffer heatstroke, resulting in seizures, organ damage and even death.

Before you head out with your pets in tow, consider whether or not you will be traveling to places that require you to leave them inside the vehicle. If you are, it’s best to leave them at home rather than risk their health or safety.

What to Do If I Find an Animal Trapped in a Car

If you should spot an animal trapped inside a car, take immediate action to prevent harm to the animal:

  • First, call 911 and request emergency assistance from your local law enforcement.
  • Second, contact the Houston SPCA at 713-869-SPCA (7722) to report this form of animal cruelty.
  • Third, notify management of any adjacent stores or businesses of the make and model of the vehicle. They may be able to page for the owner who can open the vehicle.

Together, let’s ensure a safe and healthy summer for all creatures great and small. Thank you for being proactive in protecting animals throughout Houston.

Founded in 1924, the Houston SPCA provides the most comprehensive array of animal adoption, shelter, rescue, rehabilitation and other programs and services in the Gulf Coast area. Check out all of our adoptable animals and consider the adoption option this summer.

Houston SPCA Summer Heat Safety Week

The information contained in this article is not intended to treat, diagnose or cure any ailment or disease, and is provided for reference. Please consult with your veterinarian with questions or concerns related to heat safety.


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Sand, Sun and Safety: 9 Tips for Taking Your Pets to the Beach

Everyone loves a day at the beach, including your pets!

Everyone loves a day at the beach, including your pets!

Pack a tote bag and load up the car! The beach is calling! But before you and your pet head off to enjoy the sand and surf, there are things you can do to keep your four-legged friend safe from heatstroke and other summer dangers.

Hydration is the Name of the Game

Like us humans, animals can fall victim to dehydration in the summer months. If you’re headed to the beach, pack plenty of fresh water for your pets, and a bowl they can access regularly for refreshment.

When you’re at the beach, be sure to frequently monitor your dog’s activities. If she doesn’t have enough cool, clean water to consume, she may resort to drinking seawater, which can cause additional dehydration, an upset stomach or even salt toxicity.

heat-safety-weekKnow the Signs of Heatstroke

While we rely on sweat to help cool our bodies down, dogs pant to remove body heat. If your dog is panting hard or in a way that is out of character, find shelter immediately from an umbrella, beach tent or other structure, and make cool, clean water available. Take special care with short-faced dogs, like bulldogs or pugs, since they are more susceptible to heatstroke.

Keep Their Paws Cool

Hot sand, gravel, shells and other beach surfaces can seriously injure the paws of your animal. Make a beach towel available for your dog, and be sure to rinse and examine their paws before leaving.

Apply Sunscreen Liberally to Your Pets, As Well

Too much sun exposure is equally as bad for your cats and dogs, and can result in sunburns and an increased risk in skin cancer for every member of your family. Use a sunscreen with SPF 15 or 30 on dogs, especially on breeds with lighter coats. Use a non-toxic, hypoallergenic sunscreen specially formulated for pets.

Not All Dogs Can Do the Paddle

While some dogs are adept swimmers, others may struggle in the water. Even if your dog can swim, exhaustion can set in at any moment and present a dangerous situation. Keep careful watch of your pet, and never allow her to get too far beyond the shore. Never force a dog into the water if they seem uncomfortable or are unable to stay afloat on their own.

A canine life vest will help keep your dog safe in water or while on a boat, Make sure the vest is fitted properly, since loose-fitting vests can be a choking hazard, or may cause the dog to slip out in the water.

Watch for Algae and Red Tides

Red tides which appear in salt water, and blue-green algae which can be found in freshwater both present the possibility of irritating the skin of your pets. Your dog can also experience digestive problems, liver failure, and even death if these toxins are ingested. If you detect red tide or blue-green algae, keep your pet away from the water.

Support the Houston SPCA’s Mission – Make a Donation

Pack a Picnic—and Watch What They Eat

Always pack snacks and a meal for your dog — fun at the beach can work up an appetite. Monitor her activities closely to be sure she doesn’t eat seaweed, decaying fish or other refuse, which can cause an upset stomach.

Avoid the Dunes, Grasses and Marshes

Dogs love to explore, but be very careful before allowing your animals to scout out grassy areas of the beach that could be infested with ticks, snakes and other dangers. Always check your dog’s coat and skin for signs of bites and ticks after visiting the beach.

Observe Good Pet Ownership

Always keep your dog leashed while at the beach, and follow all local laws and ordinances. Be a responsible owner by picking up her waste and disposing of it properly.

Need a friend to take to the beach? Check out all of the Houston SPCA’s adoptable animals. Founded in 1924, the Houston SPCA provides the most comprehensive array of animal adoption, shelter, rescue, rehabilitation and other programs and services in the Gulf Coast area.

Houston SPCA Summer Heat Safety Week

Sources and Recommended Reading